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Eating to Prevent Injury or Illness

Eating to Prevent Injury or Illness
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by Angie Albers, MS, LD, RD & fiancé of Philadelphia Phillies Infielder, Cody Asche

During the season, I know us women want to do everything we can to prevent our husbands/significant others from getting injured or sick. As part of my new business, Eleat Sports Nutrition, I just posted a blog on what to eat to prevent injury and illness. Something we can all refer to throughout the season!

When training intensity increases, practices become longer, and competition becomes more frequent, an athlete’s risk of getting injured or sick increases. Getting injured or sick is the last thing an athlete wants to have happen during season. Research shows that there is a close relationship between exercise and immune function. When heavy exercise is performed, stress hormones are increased and inflammation occurs, causing increased risk of injury. It also leads to a temporary decrease of the body’s immune function to fight off colds, the flu, or infection. For this reason, getting a good balance of nutrition at all times and particularly after exercise is so important for athletes. Certain foods can help to boost immune function and prevent injury.

Foods to boost immune function and prevent injury:

–       Eat carbohydrates before, during and after exercise. Carbs replenish glycogen stores, stabilize blood sugar, provides immediate energy, and aids with the protein synthesis recovery process (meaning, carbs should be consumed WITH protein!) Complex carbohydrates include 100% whole wheat bread and pasta, brown rice, oats, fruits and vegetables. Eating during exercise can be difficult for most athletes, so in this case, commercial sports drinks typically contain 6-8% carbs and also serve as a good source of electrolytes.

–       Adequate Protein Intake helps repair muscle tissue, reduces muscle breakdown after exercise, and supports immune function. Some high protein sources include: lean chicken, turkey, fish, beef, dairy, eggs, and beans

–      Healthy fats to reduce inflammation. Omega-3 works as an anti-inflammatory and should be consumed or supplemented daily. Some sources containing omega-3 fatty acids include: salmon, walnuts, chia seeds, flaxseed oil, fish oils

–       Consuming high levels of antioxidants help prevent muscular damage from free-radical activity generated by exercise. Choose fruits rich in antioxidants: citrus fruits, kiwi, strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, red apples, red grapes. Choose vegetables rich in antioxidants: spinach, broccoli, turnip greens, kale, carrots, bell peppers, asparagus, onions, and sweet potatoes

Eating a well-balanced diet and staying hydrated should be your first line of defense after a hard practice or competition.

Avoid the following foods that increase inflammation and hinder proper recovery and injury prevention:

  • Excess caffeine
  • Alcohol
  • Refined carbohydrates (white flour products)
  • Processed/packaged meals and snacks
  • Fried foods; greasy foods


Angie Albers MS, RD, LD
is a Sports Dietitian, ACSM HFS/CPT, and owner of Eleat Sports Nutrition, LLC. She holds Bachelors of Science degrees in both Dietetics and Exercise Science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  Angie also completed her dietetic internship at Saint Louis University to earn her title as a Registered Dietitian and a Masters of Science Degree in Nutrition & Physical Performance. Over her career, Angie has helped hundreds of clients achieve their nutrition and fitness goals with evidence-based and credible knowledge. She has experience consulting high school, collegiate, and professional athletes in the MLB and NFL.

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Angie Asche Angie Asche MS, RD, LD is a Sports Dietitian, ACSM HFS/CPT, owner of Eleat Sports Nutrition, LLC & wife of MLB player Cody Asche. She holds Bachelors of Science degrees in both Dietetics and Exercise Science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  Angie also completed her dietetic internship at Saint Louis University to earn her title as a Registered Dietitian and a Masters of Science Degree in Nutrition & Physical Performance. Over her career, Angie has helped hundreds of clients achieve their nutrition and fitness goals with evidence-based and credible knowledge. She has experience consulting high school, collegiate, and professional athletes in the MLB and NFL.